Farm Dam Trout Stocking

Snowy Mountains Trout Farm at Tumut provides rainbow trout for farm dam stocking. I work with SMTF and can deliver these fish for you, subject to seasonal availability.  Read on then give me a call. Steve, 0438 403 362.

Please note, rainbow trout are a cool water species. If the summer water temperature 60 centimetres below the surface is greater than 20 degrees centigrade, trout stocking is not recommended. Coastal lakes are not suitable for trout stocking.

From 1 August 2014 there has been a price rise and a new pricing structure to cover large increases in feed and electricity charges (these impact more on larger fish).  For a firm quote email stephenpauldunn@gmail.com

Price guide (please note weights and lengths are approximate ratios and may vary depending on season and condition):

Length mm Weight range grams $/fish Average number per kilo $/kilo
100 11 to 13 1.50 83.3 125.00
150 40 to 50 3.20 22.2 71.11
175 65 to 80 3.80 14.3 54.29

All fish prices are subject to GST.

I charge for delivery at 75 cents/kilometre (which can be shared for multiple deliveries).

A good farm dam with either reasonable weed or good trees and vegetation surrounding it (for terrestrial insects as food) can be stocked with up to 200 small fish (100 mm) for each half hectare of water (1 hectare is around 2.4 acres, or 100 metres by 100 metres). The aim is to have between 60 and 120 kilos of adult fish per hectare once they’ve grown out, and after some of the fish have been lost to predators etc. The better the dam, the more fish you can have in it. To stock at that level you need plenty of deep water (2 metres or  deeper) and good weed beds. A stock of yabbies helps too. For recently built or filled dams, reduce the numbers as there is less food – unless you are prepared to do some modest supplementary feeding.

A major challenge is predator control, in particular cormorants, and you must be diligent. A single cormorant on one day will bring 5 mates the next, 10 the day after.  They will eat every fish you stock unless you are there early every morning,and are vigilant through the day, to drive them away. If you intend to shoot cormorants, as wll as being a licensed shooter, you need a permit from NPWS. If you have good weed beds this is less of an issue. If you can keep the fish penned for a while, feeding them up and releasing them over time, this will also help immensely.

Fish can be fed trout feed pellets to help them grow, especially if the lake doesn’t have much natural food (as long as you’re not running an aquaculture operation aiming to sell your fish in which case you need an aquaculture permit from DPI). note that introducing food does increase nutrient levels which will increase the risk of  algal blooms – and can create an oxygen depleted layer in the lake with the risk of inversions and fish mortality. Be prepared to aerate your small lake during hot days in summer.

It is an offence to stock rivers and streams without permission from DPI.

More information at:

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/40663/Fish-in-farm-dams.pdf

http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/fisheries/recreational-fishing/inland-angling-guide/fish-species/rainbow-trout